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November 2010

Chess Problems and Compositions. Begin to improve your chess skills right now.

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 30, 2010 in Chess news

chess problemsAfter a long time of hard work, we are pleased to announce that today we launched a brand new feature here at 365Chess.com: Chess Puzzles!

With this function we want to help our chess friends to improve their game. Is in agreement, without doubt, among chess coaches that training is a basic task on the way to master chess. Everyone, from the social player to the master, must spend time solving all sorts of problems.

With problems and composition you’ll train your tactical abilities solving all kind of situations like the ones you’ll find over a chess board in a real game.

Chess Problems are a collection of computer-generated puzzles from real games and Compositions are puzzles created by a composer setting the pieces in a particular position, and your goal is to achieve a given task. For instance, a position might be given with the instruction (or stipulation) that white is to move first, and checkmate black in two moves against any possible defense.

Chess Compositions do not use positions taken from games. The Compositions you’ll face are a selection of the bests problems of all the times.

You can play in unrated mode, just for fun, without recording your solving history. Or you can have full tracking of your progress solving in Rated mode. If you play in this mode you’ll also obtain problems according to your current level.

We started with a database of 10,000 compositions and 10,000 puzzles of different levels of difficulty and we will add new continously. We promise you’ll have endless fun and entertainment.

This is just the beginning because we have a lot of new ideas and improvements to add. We think this is a really awesome feature and we’d appreciate your feedback on this.

Start solving now and have fun!

365Chess.com Team

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Russian Women’s Superfinal: Alisa Galliamova leads

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 26, 2010 in Chess news

women s superfinal 2010The Russian Women’s Superfinal is underway. All the participants demostrated an excellent chess level.

After 9 rounds Alisa Galliamova, with an outstanding performance of 2600+, is the sole leader after winning her game against Vera Nebolsina. Only half a point behind comes Nazi Paikidze, the 17 years old player from Georgia, who defeated Anastasia Bodnaruk leading the black pieces. A full point behind the leader come Natalia Pogonina and Tatiana Kosintseva.

Galliamova,A (2487) – Nebolsina,V (2377) [A48]
60th ch-RUS w Moscow RUS (9), 2010-11-25
1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bf4 d6 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. e4 c6 6. Be2 O-O 7. O-O d5 8. e5 Ne8 9. Qd2 Bg4 10. Ng5 Bxe2 11. Nxe2 h6 12. Nf3 Kh7 13. h4 Nc7 14. h5 Ne6 15. Be3 Nd7 16. Nh2 Qe8 17. hxg6+ fxg6 18. f4 h5 19. Rf3 Rf5 20. Ng3 Qf7 21. Nxf5 Qxf5 22. Nf1 Rf8 23. Ng3 Qg4 24. f5 h4 25. fxe6 hxg3 26. exd7 Qh4 27. Rxf8  1 – 0 (view game)

Bodnaruk,A (2407) – Paikidze,N (2401) [B23]
60th ch-RUS w Moscow RUS (9), 2010-11-25
1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 d6 3. f4 Nc6 4. Nf3 g6 5. d4 cxd4 6. Nxd4 Bg7 7. Be3 Nf6 8. Be2 O-O 9. Nb3 e5 10. O-O exf4 11. Bxf4 Re8 12. Qxd6 Qb6+ 13. Kh1 Nxe4 14. Nxe4 Rxe4 15. Bf3 Re6 16. Qd2 Re8 17. c3 Bf5 18. Rad1 Rad8 19. Qc1 Ne5 20. Be3 Qc7 21. Rxd8 Rxd8 22. Nd4 Nxf3 23. Nxf3 Be4 24. Qe1 Bd3 25. Rf2 Bc4 26. a3 Re8 27. Qd2 a6 28. Bd4 Bxd4 29. cxd4 Bd5 30. Ne5 Rc8 31. h3 Qc1+ 32. Kh2 Kg7 33. Nd3 Qxd2 34. Rxd2 f5 35. Kg3 g5 36. Nc5 Kf6 37. Kf2 Rc7 38. b4 h5 39. g3 h4 40. a4 hxg3+ 41. Kxg3 f4+ 42. Kf2 Rh7 43. Re2 b6 44. Re5 bxc5 45. Rxd5 cxb4 46. Rd6+ Kf5 47. Rxa6 Rxh3 48. Rb6 Rh2+ 49. Kg1 Ra2 50. Rb5+ Kg4 51. a5 b3 52. Rxb3 Rxa5 53. Rd3 Kf5 54. Rd1 Ke4 55. Kf2 g4 56. Rd2 Rd5 57. Re2+ Kxd4 58. Re8 Ra5 59. Rd8+ Ke4 60. Re8+ Re5 61. Ra8 g3+ 62. Kg2 Kf5 63. Rf8+ Kg4 64. Rg8+ Rg5 65. Rf8 Rg7 66. Rf6 Ra7 67. Rg6+ Kf5 68. Rb6 Ra2+ 69. Kg1 Kg4 70. Rb4 Kh3 71. Rxf4 Ra1+ 72. Rf1 Rxf1+ 73. Kxf1 Kh2  0 – 1 (view game)

Shadrina,T (2384) – Kosintseva,T (2581) [C78]
60th ch-RUS w Moscow RUS (9), 2010-11-25
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Bb7 7. Re1 Bc5 8. c3 d6 9. d3 h6 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Nf1 Ne7 12. Ng3 Ng6 13. d4 Bb6 14. h3 Re8 15. Bc2 d5 16. Nxe5 Nxe5 17. dxe5 Nxe4 18. Nxe4 dxe4 19. Qh5 g6 20. Qxh6 Rxe5 21. Be3 c5 22. Rad1 Qf6 23. Qf4 Qxf4 24. Bxf4 Re6 25. g4 Rae8 26. g5 Kg7 27. Rd2 c4 28. Be3 Bxe3 29. fxe3 Rh8 30. Rh2 f6 31. gxf6+ Rxf6 32. Rd1 Bc8 33. Bxe4 Bxh3 34. Rf2 Re8 35. Rd4 Re5 36. Rxf6 Kxf6 37. Kf2 Be6 38. Bb7 Rh5 39. Rd6 a5 40. Bc8 Re5 41. Rb6 Kf5 42. Bxe6+ Rxe6 43. Rxb5+ Kg4 44. Rc5 g5 45. Rxc4+ Kh3 46. Rc5 Rf6+ 47. Ke2 g4 48. Rxa5 g3 49. b4 g2 50. Rh5+ Kg4 51. Rh8 Rf1 52. Rg8+ Kh3 53. a4 g1=Q 54. Rxg1 Rxg1 55. a5 Kg4 56. Kd3 Kf5 57. Kc4 Ke6 58. Kc5 Kd7 59. c4 Kc7 60. b5 Rg5+ 61. Kd4 Rg1 62. c5 Rd1+ 63. Kc4 Rc1+ 64. Kd5 Rd1+ 65. Kc4 Rc1+ 66. Kd5 Rd1+ 67. Ke4 Rc1 68. Kd5 Rd1+ 69. Kc4 Rc1+ 70. Kd4 Rd1+ 71. Kc4 Rc1+  ½ – ½ (view game)

Pogonina,N (2472) – Kosintseva,N (2576) [C78]
60th ch-RUS w Moscow RUS (9), 2010-11-25
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. a4 Rb8 8. d3 d6 9. axb5 axb5 10. Nc3 Bg4 11. Be3 O-O 12. h3 Bxf3 13. Qxf3 Nd4 14. Bxd4 Bxd4 15. Ra2 Bxc3 16. bxc3 Ra8 17. Rfa1 Rxa2 18. Rxa2 Qd7 19. Ra6 Qc8 20. Ra7 Qb8 21. Qe3 c5 22. Ra6 Rd8 23. Bd5 Nxd5 24. exd5 h6 25. Qe4 Qb7 26. Rc6 Qd7 27. Qg4 Qa7 28. Kh2 Qb7 29. Qf5 b4 30. cxb4 cxb4 31. Qg4 b3 32. cxb3 Qxb3 33. Qh4 Rd7 34. Rc8+ Kh7 35. Qe4+ g6 36. Rc6 Kg7 37. Qc4 Qb2 38. Qg4 Ra7 39. Qf3 Qb8 40. Qe3 Ra5 41. Qe4 Rb5 42. Qf3 Rb4 43. Rc4 Rxc4 44. dxc4 Qb2 45. Qe3 Qb4 46. Qd3 f5 47. f4 e4 48. Qd4+ Kf7 49. Qa7+ Kg8 50. Qc7 h5 51. Qd8+ Kf7 52. Qd7+ Kf8 53. Qe6 Kg7 54. Qe7+ Kg8 55. Qf6 Kh7 56. Qf7+ Kh6 57. Qg8 Qc3 58. Qf8+ Kh7 59. Qxd6 e3 60. Qe7+ Kh6 61. Qf8+ Kh7 62. Qe7+ Kh6 63. d6 Qd4 64. Kg3 Qd2 65. Qe5 Kh7 66. d7 e2 67. d8=Q Qxd8 68. Qxe2 h4+ 69. Kh2 Qc7 70. Qe5 Qxc4 71. Qe7+ Kg8 72. Qxh4 Qe6 73. Qd8+ Kf7 74. Qc7+ Kf8 75. Qc3 Kf7 76. Kg3 Qd6 77. Qc4+ Kg7 78. h4 Qa3+ 79. Kh2 Qd6 80. Qc3+ Kh7 81. Qe5 Qd8 82. Qe1 Qd6 83. Qg3 Qd1 84. Qg5 Qe2 85. Qf6 Qd1 86. Qg5 Qe2 87. Qf6 Qd1 88. Qg5 Qe2  ½ – ½ (view game)

Standings after 9 rounds

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2
1. Galliamova, Alisa m RUS 2487 * 1 ½ . 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 . 2604
2. Paikidze, Nazi wg GEO 2401 0 * 0 1 1 . 1 1 . ½ ½ 1 6 2585
3. Pogonina, Natalija wg RUS 2472 ½ 1 * ½ . ½ 1 . 1 ½ ½ 0 2539
4. Kosintseva, Tatiana g RUS 2581 . 0 ½ * ½ ½ ½ 1 1 . 1 ½ 2523
5. Shadrina, Tatiana wg RUS 2384 1 0 . ½ * 0 1 0 0 1 . 1 2472
6. Kosintseva, Nadezhda m RUS 2576 0 . ½ ½ 1 * 0 . 1 ½ 0 1 2445
7. Bodnaruk, Anastasia m RUS 2407 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 * ½ . 1 1 . 4 2427
8. Kosteniuk, Alexandra g RUS 2507 0 0 . 0 1 . ½ * ½ 1 0 1 4 2394
9. Nebolsina, Vera wg RUS 2377 0 . 0 0 1 0 . ½ * ½ 1 1 4 2435
10. Girya, Olga wg RUS 2435 1 ½ ½ . 0 ½ 0 0 ½ * . ½ 2374
11. Matveeva, Svetlana m RUS 2389 0 ½ ½ 0 . 1 0 1 0 . * 0 3 2351
12. Gunina, Valentina wg RUS 2479 . 0 1 ½ 0 0 . 0 0 ½ 1 * 3 2333
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Judit Polgar won UNAM chess elite quad

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 24, 2010 in Chess news

judit polgarThe National University of Mexico (UNAM) celebrated its 100 years anniversary with a huge chess festival which had Kasparov and Karpov giving simuls, an open tournament and an elite’s Quad event. In the latter participated Veselin Topalov, Vassily Ivanchuk, Judith Polgar and Manuel Leon Hoyos.

This was a knockout event pairing Judit Polgar vs Vassily Ivanchuk and Veselin Topalov vs Manuel Leon Hoyos at its first stage. After the initial round Judit Polgar and Veselin Topalov advanced to the finals.

After a initial draw, Judit Polgar won three games in a row finishing the match 3.5 – 0.5

Polgar, Judit (2686) – Topalov, Veselin (2786) [C67]
Ajedrez UNAM KO Mexico City MEX (2.2), 2010-11-21
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. Nc3 h6 10. h3 Bd7 11. Ne4 b6 12. b3 Kc8 13. Bb2 c5 14. c4 Kb7 15. Rad1 Be6 16. Nc3 g5 17. Nd5 Ne7 18. Rd3 Ng6 19. Rfd1 Rd8 20. R3d2 Bg7 21. Kh2 Kc8 22. g4 Bxd5 23. cxd5 Rhe8 24. Re1 Nf4 25. Red1 Rd7 26. d6 Ng6 27. e6 Rxe6 28. Bxg7 cxd6 29. Bxh6 f6 30. Kg3 Kc7 31. Rd5 Kc6 32. Nxg5 fxg5 33. Bxg5 Ne5 34. h4 b5 35. f4 Nf7 36. f5 Re4 37. Bf4 c4 38. bxc4 bxc4 39. g5 c3 40. R5d3 Rc4 41. g6 c2 42. Rc1 Nd8 43. Rd2  1 – 0 (view game)

Topalov, Veselin (2786) – Polgar, Judit (2686) [A85]
Ajedrez UNAM KO Mexico City MEX (2.3), 2010-11-21
1. d4 f5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. h4 d6 5. h5 Nxh5 6. Rxh5 gxh5 7. e4 Be6 8. Be2 Bf7 9. Bxh5 Bxh5 10. Qxh5+ Kd7 11. Nf3 Qe8 12. Qh3 Bg7 13. exf5 Bf6 14. Bh6 Nc6 15. O-O-O Qf7 16. b3 a5 17. a4 Rag8 18. g4 Kd8 19. Nd5 e6 20. fxe6 Qxe6 21. Re1 Qf7 22. Re4 Nb4 23. Nxb4 axb4 24. Bd2 Qg6 25. Rf4 Be7 26. g5 Rf8 27. Nh4 Qh5 28. Qg3 Rxf4 29. Bxf4 Rf8 30. Nf3 Qf7 31. g6 Qxf4+ 32. Qxf4 Rxf4  0 – 1 (view game)

Polgar, Judit (2686) – Topalov, Veselin (2786) [C33]
Ajedrez UNAM KO Mexico City MEX (2.4), 2010-11-21
1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Bc4 d5 4. exd5 Qh4+ 5. Kf1 Bd6 6. Nf3 Qh5 7. Nc3 Ne7 8. d4 O-O 9. Kf2 Nd7 10. Re1 Nb6 11. Bb3 Nexd5 12. Nxd5 Nxd5 13. c4 Ne3 14. Bxe3 fxe3+ 15. Rxe3 Bf5 16. c5 Bf4 17. Re7 Bg4 18. Re4 Qf5 19. Bc2 Bh5 20. Re5 Bxf3 21. Kxf3 Qf6 22. Rf5 Qh6 23. Rxf4 Rae8 24. Qd3 f5 25. h4 Re4 26. Qd2 Re7 27. Re1  1 – 0 (view game)

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Levon Aronian won VI World Blitz Moscow 2010

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 19, 2010 in Chess news

world blitz 2010Following the Tal Memorial, The VI World Blitz took place in Moscow from Nov 16th to Nov 18th 2010. 14 rounds were played the first two days and 10 rounds the last day.

Levon Aronian continued in his good shape and took clear first place with 24.5/38. Half a point ahead of Temour Radjabov who was a further half point clear of defending champion Magnus Carlsen.

Final Standings

Rk Name Ti FED Rtg + Pts TB2
1 Aronian. Levon GM ARM 2801 20 24.5 433.50
2 Radjabov. Teimour GM AZE 2744 18 24.0 447.00
3 Carlsen. Magnus GM NOR 2802 19 23.5 431.75
4 Gelfand. Boris GM ISR 2741 17 21.5 398.75
5 Nakamura. Hikaru GM USA 2741 17 21.5 397.50
6 Karjakin. Sergey GM RUS 2760 15 20.5 396.00
7 Kramnik. Vladimir GM RUS 2791 16 20.5 384.50
8 Mamedyarov. Shakhriyar GM AZE 2763 17 19.5 362.25
9 Svidler. Peter GM RUS 2722 13 19.5 361.00
10 Eljanov. Pavel GM UKR 2742 16 19.0 345.00
11 Grischuk. Alexander GM RUS 2771 12 19.0 348.50
12 Mamedov. Rauf GM AZE 2660 14 18.0 333.75
13 Nepomniachtchi. Ian GM RUS 2720 13 18.0 326.25
14 Vachier-Lagrave. Maxime GM FRA 2703 12 18.0 349.50
15 Movsesian. Sergei GM SVK 2721 16 17.5 315.25
16 Andreikin. Dmitry GM RUS 2683 13 17.5 314.25
17 Grachev. Boris GM RUS 2654 10 16.5 313.00
18 Savchenko. Boris GM RUS 2632 14 15.5 286.25
19 Caruana. Fabiano GM ITA 2709 11 13.5 249.25
20 Ponomariov. Ruslan GM UKR 2744 7 12.5 235.25
20 players
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Aronian and Karjakin shared the title at Tal Memorial

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 15, 2010 in Chess news

Tal MemorialAfter 9 rounds played, Levon Aronian (ARM), Sergey Karjakin (RUS) and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (AZE) ended with 5.5 points over 9 possible. Mamedyarov’s defeat at the last round cost him the title and he ended in the 3rd position because of his SB.

No tiebreak method was useful to declare a single winner. Results of direct encounters, the “Koya system, the Sonneborn-Berger system, the number of games each player won; all of that solved nothing. Despite it is not officially announced yet, Aronian and Karjakin shared the first place.

Gelfand,B (2741) – Mamedyarov,S (2763) [A15]
Tal Memorial Moscow RUS (9), 2010-11-14
1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. g3 Bg7 6. Bg2 Nxc3 7. bxc3 Nc6 8. O-O O-O 9. d4 Be6 10. e4 Bc4 11. Re1 Qd7 12. Nd2 Ba6 13. e5 Rad8 14. h4 b6 15. h5 Na5 16. hxg6 fxg6 17. Nb3 Nc4 18. Qe2 Qe6 19. Bf4 Qf7 20. Nd2 Nxd2 21. Qxa6 g5 22. Be3 g4 23. Bf4 Nf3+ 24. Bxf3 gxf3 25. Qd3 Qh5 26. Re3 c5 27. Rxf3 cxd4 28. cxd4 Bh6 29. Kg2 Bxf4 30. gxf4 Qf5 31. Rd1 Kh8 32. Qxf5 Rxf5 33. d5 b5 34. Rd4 a5 35. Rc3 Rdf8 36. Rc7  1 – 0 (view game)

Wang Hao (2727) – Karjakin,Sergey (2760) [A29]
Tal Memorial Moscow RUS (9), 2010-11-14
1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nb6 7. O-O Be7 8. d3 O-O 9. a3 Be6 10. b4 a5 11. b5 Nd4 12. Rb1 Nd5 13. Na4 Nxf3+ 14. Bxf3 f5 15. Bb2 Bd6 16. Qb3 Nf4 17. Qc2 Nh3+ 18. Kg2 Ng5 19. Bxb7 Rb8 20. Bc6 f4 21. Nc5 f3+ 22. exf3 Bh3+ 23. Kh1 Nxf3 24. Qc4+ Kh8 25. Ne6 Bxe6 26. Qxe6 Nd2 27. Rbd1 Nxf1 28. Rxf1 Rf6 29. Qc4 Qf8 30. f3 Bxa3 31. Bxe5 Rf7 32. Bd5 Rd7 33. Bxc7 Rxc7 34. Qxc7 Rxb5 35. Qd7 Rb8 36. Re1 Bb2 37. Re6 Rd8 38. Qb5 a4 39. Qxa4 Bf6 40. Be4 g6 41. Kg2 Bd4 42. h4 Qc5 43. h5 Qc1 44. hxg6 Qg1+ 45. Kh3 Bf2 46. Re8+ Kg7 47. Re7+ Kf8 48. Rf7+ Kg8 49. gxh7+ Kh8 50. Kg4 Qxg3+ 51. Kf5 Bd4 52. Qc6 Qh3+ 53. Kg6 Qg3+ 54. Kf5 Qh3+ 55. Kg6 Qg3+ 56. Kf5  ½ – ½ (view game)

Eljanov,P (2742) – Aronian,L (2801) [D45]
Tal Memorial Moscow RUS (9), 2010-11-14
1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5. Nf3 Nbd7 6. Qc2 Bd6 7. Bd3 O-O 8. O-O dxc4 9. Bxc4 b5 10. Bd3 Bb7 11. Ng5 h6 12. Nge4 Nxe4 13. Nxe4 Be7 14. Rd1 Qb6 15. Bd2 c5 16. Nxc5 Nxc5 17. dxc5 Bxc5 18. Ba5 Qc6 19. Bf1 Rfc8 20. Rac1 a6 21. Qd3 Qd5 22. a3 Be7 23. Bc3 Qxd3 24. Bxd3 Bd5 25. Bd4 Kf8 26. f4 g6 27. Kf2 Ke8 28. g3 f5 29. h3 h5 30. h4 Kd7 31. Ke2 Rxc1 32. Rxc1 Rc8 33. Rxc8 Kxc8 34. b4  ½ – ½ (view game)

Final standings

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
1. Aronian, Levon g ARM 2801 * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 2832
2. Karjakin, Sergey g RUS 2760 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ ½ 2836
3. Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar g AZE 2763 ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 1 2836
4. Grischuk, Alexander g RUS 2771 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 5 2798
5. Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 2741 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 5 2802
6. Wang Hao g CHN 2727 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 1 ½ 5 2803
7. Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2791 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ 1 1 2753
8. Gelfand, Boris g ISR 2741 0 0 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ * 1 0 2679
9. Shirov, Alexei g ESP 2735 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 * 1 3 2634
10. Eljanov, Pavel g UKR 2742 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 * 2592
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Anatoly Karpov won the match against Hou Yifan

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 12, 2010 in Chess news

The match between the former World Champion Anatoly Karpov and the Chinese chess prodigy Hou Yifan, concluded in victory for the 12th World Champion.

After winning the first match with black pieces, Anatoly Karpov drew the rest of the games and won the match 3.5:2.5

Karpov, Anatoly (2619) – Hou, Yifan (2577) [D38]
Match rapid Sanya/Hainan/China (1), 2010-11-11
1. d4 e6 2. c4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Qa4+ Nc6 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bxf6 Qxf6 9. e3 O-O 10. Be2 Be6 11. O-O a6 12. Qc2 Bd6 13. a3 Rad8 14. Na4 Bc8 15. Nc5 g5 16. Rac1 Qg7 17. Qb3 Na5 18. Qc3 Nc6 19. Qb3 Na5 20. Qa4 g4 21. Ne1 Nc6 22. g3 Rfe8 23. Bd3 Ne7 24. Qb3 a5 25. Ng2 b6 26. Na4 Be6 27. Nc3 c6 28. Ne2 Rb8 29. Qa4 Bd7 30. Nef4 Qg5 31. b4 Ra8 32. Qb3 a4 33. Qc2 Kg7 34. Qb2 b5 35. Nh4 Rac8 36. Rfe1 Nf5 37. Bxf5 Bxf5 38. Nxf5+ Qxf5 39. Ng2 Qd7 40. Rf1 Qf5 41. Qe2 Qg5 42. f3 h5 43. Rf2 Re6 44. Rcf1 Rc7 45. fxg4 Qxg4 46. Qd2 Rg6 47. Nf4 Rg5 48. Rg2 Re7 49. h3 Qd7 50. h4 Bxf4 51. Rxf4 Rg4 52. Kf2 Qe6 53. Qd3 Rg6 54. Rg1 Kf8 55. Ke2 Ke8 56. Rf3 Qg4 57. Kf2 Re4 58. Rf4 Qe6 59. Qe2 Rg4 60. Qf3 Ke7 61. Re1 Qg6 62. Rc1 Re6 63. Re1 Re4 64. Rc1 Re6  ½ – ½ (view game)

Hou, Yifan (2577) – Karpov, Anatoly (2619) [C93]
Match rapid Sanya/Hainan/China (2), 2010-11-11
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 Bb7 10. d4 Re8 11. Nbd2 Bf8 12. a3 h6 13. d5 Nb8 14. Nh2 c6 15. dxc6 Nxc6 16. Ng4 Nxg4 17. hxg4 Na5 18. Bd5 Be7 19. b4 Nc6 20. Qf3 Rf8 21. Nf1 Qd7 22. Ng3 Nd8 23. Nf5 Ne6 24. Rd1 Bxd5 25. Rxd5 Rfd8 26. g3 Qe8 27. Be3 Rac8 28. Rd3 Rc6 29. Rad1 Rdc8 30. Bd2 Qf8 31. Kg2 Rd8 32. Qe2 Bg5 33. Rh1 Rd7 34. Bxg5 Nxg5 35. f3 Qc8 36. Qd2 a5 37. Rd1 (37. Rxh6 gxh6 38. Nxh6+ Kh8 39. Qxg5) 37… axb4 38. axb4 Qa8 39. Qe2 Qa3 40. Nxd6 Rxc3 41. Rxc3 Qxc3 42. Nxb5 Qc6 43. Rxd7 Qxd7 44. Nc3 Ne6 45. Nd5 Qa4 46. Qb2 Qd1 47. Ne3 Qd3 48. Kf2 Nd4 49. Qa2 g6 50. Qb2 Kg7 51. Qa2 Qc3 52. b5 Nxb5 53. Qd5 Nc7 54. Qd1 Ne6 55. Qc2 Qb4 56. Qc4 Qb2+ 57. Qe2  ½ – ½ (view game)

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Grischuk will replace Carlsen in the Candidates Matches 2011

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 10, 2010 in Chess news

carlsen-grischukLast friday the Magnus Carlsen announced his decision to droup out of the current World Championship cycle. The 19-year-old Norwegian GM, in his own words, said: “After careful consideration I’ve reached the conclusion that the ongoing 2008–2012 cycle does not represent a system, sufficiently modern and fair, to provide the motivation I need to go through a lengthy process of preparations and matches and to perform at my best.”.

The series of knock-out matches is planned to begin in March next year. Of those matches will arise the challenger of the World Champion Vishy Anand.

Today we had FIDE’s response to Carlsen’s letter. FIDE’s Deputy President, Georgios Makropoulos, through a press release, expressed respect with Carlsen’s decision and regrets his withdrawal from the upcoming Candidates Matches.

The World Chess Federation announced that Alexander Grischuk will replace Magnus Carlsen in the 2011 Candidates matches.

Carlsen’s letter to FIDE

To: FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov & FIDE World Championship Committee.

Reference is made to the ongoing World Championship cycle.

The purpose of this letter is to inform you of my decision not to take part in the planned Candidate Matches between March and May 2011.

After careful consideration I’ve reached the conclusion that the ongoing 2008–2012 cycle does not represent a system, sufficiently modern and fair, to provide the motivation I need to go through a lengthy process of preparations and matches and to perform at my best.

Reigning champion privileges, the long (five year) span of the cycle, changes made during the cycle resulting in a new format (Candidates) that no World Champion has had to go through since Kasparov, puzzling ranking criteria as well as the shallow ceaseless match-after-match concept are all less than satisfactory in my opinion.

By providing you with four months notice before the earliest start of the Candidates as well as in time before you have presented player contracts or detailed regulations, I rest assured that you will be able to find an appropriate replacement.

Although the purpose of this letter is not to influence you to make further changes to the ongoing cycle, I would like to take the opportunity to present a few ideas about future cycles in line with our input to FIDE during the December 27th 2008 phone conference between FIDE leaders and a group of top-level players.

In my opinion privileges should in general be abolished and a future World Championship model should be based on a fair fight between the best players in the World, on equal terms. This should apply also to the winner of the previous World Championship, and especially so when there are several players at approximately the same level in the world elite. (Why should one player have one out of two tickets to the final to the detriment of all remaining players in the world? Imagine that the winner of the 2010 Football World Cup would be directly qualified to the 2014 World Cup final while all the rest of the teams would have to fight for the other spot.)

One possibility for future cycles would be to stage an 8-10 player World Championship tournament similar to the 2005 and 2007 events.

The proposal to abolish the privileges of the World Champion in the future is not in any way meant as criticism of, or an attack on, the reigning World Champion Viswanathan Anand, who is a worthy World Champion, a role model chess colleague and a highly esteemed opponent.

Rest assured that I am still motivated to play competitive chess. My current plan is to continue to participate in well-organised top-level tournaments and to try to maintain the no 1 spot on the rating list that I have successfully defended for most of 2010.

Best regards,
IGM Magnus Carlsen

FIDE announcement for the Candidates Matches 2011

FIDE respects that every player makes his own decisions and regrets that GM Magnus Carlsen has expressed his desire to withdraw from the upcoming Candidates Matches. It is always a big loss for any event when a player of Magnus Carlsen’s strength is not participating. FIDE’s policy is to review regularly the World Championship cycle after consultation with the top world players. At this point in time, the current cycle is in its final stages and it is not possible for FIDE to change its regulations. In the case of GM Magnus Carlsen not participating, according to regulations GM Alexander Grischuk from Russia will be his replacement.

The match system for the World Championship has been in place for around a century with some slight variations such as in 1948 or 1999-2007 when round-robin or knock-out tournaments were also used to decide the world title. FIDE has always been sceptical about World Championship matches instead of tournaments. Ten years ago, FIDE established that the World Champion should not have any privilege when entering the World Championship Tournament (knock-out or round-robin), in accordance with the current suggestions of GM Magnus Carlsen. After 2007, FIDE discussed the format with a number of top players and many of them, including former World Champions Anatoly Karpov, Gary Kasparov and Vladimir Kramnik still preferred a match to decide the winner of the title instead of a tournament. FIDE accepted this change and returned to the classical system of a World Championship Match but without the privilege of the World Champion keeping his title in case of a tie.

As a matter of principle, FIDE cannot change its regulations upon the wish of a single player, even if this player is the World Champion or the No.1 or No.2 of the world ratings. On the other hand, FIDE is always open for suggestions which can be applicable in the future and which would also support or increase the marketing value of the World Championship.

Best regards,

Georgios Makropoulos
FIDE Deputy President

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Karpov – Hou Yifan match

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 10, 2010 in Chess news

karpov - hou yifanFrom November 6th to November 11th, is taking place at the Wenhua Oriental Hotel in Sanya city, Hainan, China; the match between the former World Champion Anatoly Karpov and the Chinese chess prodigy Hou Yifan.

The match consist of 4 regular games (90 min for all moves + 30 sec increment for each move) and 2 rapid games (25 min + 10 sec.).

After 3 days of competition Karpov is leading 2-1.

Hou, Yifan (2577) – Karpov, Anatoly (2619) [C49]
Match Sanya/Hainan/China (1), 2010-11-06
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 d6 7. Bg5 Bxc3 8. bxc3 Qe7 9. Re1 a6 10. Bxc6 bxc6 11. d4 a5 12. Rb1 Qe6 13. a3 Nd7 14. Nh4 f6 15. Bc1 Nb6 16. Nf5 Nc4 17. Ne3 Ba6 18. f4 Nxe3 19. Bxe3 Qc4 20. Qd2 Rae8 21. fxe5 fxe5 22. Bf2 h6 23. h3 Rf7 24. Bg3 Kh7 25. Kh2 Bb5 26. Rbd1 Re6 27. Ra1 Ba4 28. dxe5 dxe5 29. Rac1 Qc5 30. Qe3 Qxe3 31. Rxe3 Rd7 32. Rd3 Rdd6 33. Kg1 Bb5 34. Rdd1 Be2 35. Re1 Rd2 36. Bf2 Bb5 37. Be3 Rd7 38. Rcd1 Red6 39. Rxd6 cxd6 40. Bb6 a4 41. Be3 c5 42. Kf2 Rf7+ 43. Kg3 Rf6 44. Bd2 $2 {Putting the bishop on a square where it can be attacked by the black rook on f2.} Kg8 $2 ( 44… Bf1 $1 $19) 45. Re3 $2 Bc6 $2 (45… Bf1 $1 $19) 46. Re2 Rf1 $1 47. Be1 Kf7 48. c4 Ke6 49. Bd2 Ra1 50. Re3 Ra2 51. Kf3 Rxc2 52. Bc3 Bb7 53. g3 Ba6 54. Be1 Bxc4 {Black has picked off two pawns, and has the powerful bishop pair. The game is lost for White.} 55. Rc3 Be2+ 56. Ke3 Ra2 57. Bd2 Bf1 58. h4 Bh3 59. Bc1 Bf1 60. Bd2 Kd7 61. Bc1 Kc6 62. Kf3 Be2+ 63. Ke3 Bh5 64. Bd2 Bg4 65. Kd3 Kb5 66. Ke3  0 – 1 (view game)

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Levon Aronian is the leader of the 5th Tal Memorial

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 9, 2010 in Chess news

Tal MemorialFrom November 5th to November 14th is taking place, in Moscow, Russia, the 5th Tal Memorial. 10 top GM are fighting for the glory in this edition.

After 4 rounds Levon Aronian is the leader after beating Gelfand at round 3, and a draw with black pieces agains Mamedyarov at round 4.

Round 3: Sunday, November 7th, 2009
A. Shirov 
0-1
 S. Mamedyarov 
S. Karjakin 
½-½
 H. Nakamura
L. Aronian 
1-0
 B. Gelfand
A. Grischuk 
½-½
 Wang Hao
P. Eljanov 

0-1
 V. Kramnik
Round 4: Monday, November 8th, 2010
S. Mamedyarov 

½-½
 L. Aronian
S. Karjakin 
½-½
 A. Shirov
B. Gelfand 
½-½
 A. Grischuk
Wang Hao 
½-½
 P. Eljanov
H. Nakamura 

½-½
 V. Kramnik

Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar (2763) – Aronian, Levon (2801) [D11]
Tal Memorial Moscow RUS (4), 2010-11-08
1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Qc2 dxc4 5. Qxc4 Bf5 6. g3 e6 7. Bg2 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. Rd1 Nbd7 10. e3 e5 11. Nc3 Qc7 12. h3 Rfe8 13. dxe5 Nxe5 14. Nxe5 Qxe5 15. e4 Be6 16. Qe2 Bb4 17. f4 Qa5 18. Be3 Rad8 19. Qf2 Rxd1+ 20. Rxd1 Bxc3 21. bxc3 Qa4 22. Rd4 Bc4 23. Qd2 c5 24. Rd8 Rxd8 25. Qxd8+ Qe8 26. Qd6 b6 27. e5 Qd7 28. Qb8+ Ne8 29. Qa8 Kf8 30. a3 Qd3 31. Bf2 Qd1+ 32. Kh2 Qc2 33. Kg1 Qd1+ 34. Kh2 Qc2 35. Kg1  ½ – ½ (view game)

Gelfand, Boris (2741) – Grischuk, Alexander (2771) [D02]
Tal Memorial Moscow RUS (4), 2010-11-08
1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. g3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Bg2 c6 7. Qc2 Nbd7 8. Bf4 O-O 9. O-O b6 10. Rd1 Ba6 11. b3 Rc8 12. Nc3 Re8 13. e4 dxc4 14. Nd2 b5 15. bxc4 bxc4 16. Bf1 Nb6 17. Rab1 h6 18. a4 c5 19. Nf3 cxd4 20. Rxd4 Nbd7 21. e5 Bc5 22. Rdd1 Nd5 23. Nxd5 exd5 24. Rxd5 Qe7 25. Bh3 Nb6 26. Rd6 Bb7 27. a5 Bxf3 28. axb6 axb6 29. Rd7 Qf8 30. e6 fxe6 31. Bxh6 Re7 32. Bxe6+ Rxe6 33. Rxg7+ Qxg7 34. Bxg7 Be4 35. Qe2 Kxg7 36. Qg4+ Kf7 37. Re1 Rce8 38. Rxe4 Rxe4 39. Qf5+ Kg7 40. Qg5+ Kf7 41. Qf5+  ½ – ½ (view game)

Karjakin, Sergey (2760) – Shirov, Alexei (2735) [C78]
Tal Memorial Moscow RUS (4), 2010-11-08
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. c3 d6 8. d4 Bb6 9. Be3 O-O 10. Nbd2 Bg4 11. h3 Bh5 12. Bg5 exd4 13. Bd5 dxc3 14. Bxc6 cxd2 15. Bxa8 Qxa8 16. Bxf6 gxf6 17. Qxd2 Qxe4 18. Rfe1 Qf5 19. Nh4 Qg5 20. Qxg5+ fxg5 21. Nf5 Bg6 22. Ne7+ Kg7 23. Nd5 Rb8 24. Rad1 Kf8 25. g4 c5 26. h4 gxh4 27. f4 f5 28. g5 Bf7 29. Nf6 c4+ 30. Kg2 Rd8 31. Nxh7+ Kg7 32. Nf6 b4 33. Re7 c3 34. bxc3 bxc3 35. Nd7 Ba5 36. g6 Kxg6 37. Kh3 Rxd7 38. Rxd7 Bb4 39. Kxh4 Bxa2 40. R1xd6+ Bxd6 41. Rxd6+ Kf7 42. Rc6 a5 43. Rxc3 a4 44. Rc6 Ke7 45. Kg3 Kd7 46. Ra6 Bb3 47. Kf2 Kc7 48. Ke1 Kb7 49. Rh6 Kc7 50. Kd2 a3 51. Kc3 a2 52. Kb2 Kd7 53. Ra6 Bc4 54. Ra5 Be6 55. Ra7+ Kc6 56. Ra6+ Kd7 57. Kc3 Kc7 58. Kd4 Kb7 59. Ra3 Kb6 60. Ke5 Bc4 61. Kxf5 Kc5 62. Kg6 Kb4 63. Rxa2 Bxa2  ½ – ½ (view game)

Wang, Hao (2727) – Eljanov, Pavel (2742) [A29]
Tal Memorial Moscow RUS (4), 2010-11-08
1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 Nd4 5. Bg2 Nxf3+ 6. Bxf3 Bb4 7. Qb3 Bc5 8. O-O O-O 9. Na4 Be7 10. d4 d6 11. Rd1 exd4 12. Rxd4 Nd7 13. Bf4 Bf6 14. Rd2 Be5 15. Be3 Qe7 16. Nc3 Nf6 17. Nd5 Nxd5 18. cxd5 b6 19. Rc1 Bf5 20. Qc4 Rfc8 21. Bd4 Bxd4 22. Rxd4 a5 23. b3 Ra7 24. Kg2 Re8 25. Rf4 Bd7 26. a3 Qd8 27. h4 Re5 28. e3 Qe8 29. Rd4 Re7 30. Qc3 Bf5 31. Rc4 Bc8 32. Qd4 Ba6 33. R4c3 Bc8 34. Qf4 Qd7 35. e4 Qe8 36. Re3 f6 37. h5 Rf7 38. Rec3 Qe5 39. Qe3 h6 40. Rh1 Re7 41. Rh4 Qg5 42. Qe2 Qe5 43. Qc2 b5 44. Qd2 Bd7 45. Rh1 Ra8 46. g4 Rb8 47. b4 a4 48. Rhc1 Rb7 49. Qe3 Be8 50. Kf1 Qg5 51. Be2 Qxe3 52. Rxe3 Kf8 53. f3 Rb6 54. Rec3 c6 55. Kf2 cxd5 56. exd5 Rb8 57. Bd3 Re5 58. Rc8 Rxc8 59. Rxc8 Rxd5 60. Bg6 Re5 61. f4 Re7 62. Rd8 Re6 63. Kf3 Re1 64. Rb8 d5 65. Kf2 Re6 66. Bf5 Re7 67. Bd3 Kf7 68. Bg6+ Kf8 69. Rd8 d4 70. Bd3 Rb7 71. Bg6 Re7 72. Rb8 Re3 73. Rc8 Re6 74. Rd8 Re7 75. Rxd4 Rd7 76. Ke3 Rxd4 77. Kxd4 Bxg6 78. hxg6 Ke7 79. f5  ½ – ½ (view game)

Nakamura, Hikaru (2741) – Kramnik, Vladimir (2791) [C42]
Tal Memorial Moscow RUS (4), 2010-11-08
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Be7 7. Be3 O-O 8. Qd2 Nd7 9. O-O-O Re8 10. h4 c6 11. Bd3 Nf6 12. Rde1 d5 13. Bd4 c5 14. Bxf6 Bxf6 15. Qf4 Be6 16. Ng5 g6 17. Bb5 Rf8 18. Nxe6 fxe6 19. Rxe6 Bxc3 20. Qg4 Bg7 21. h5 c4 22. hxg6 h6 23. Rd1 Qa5 24. Rxd5 Qxa2 25. Bxc4 Qxb2+ 26. Kd1 Kh8 27. f3 a5 28. Rd7 a4 29. Qh4 Qb1+ 30. Kd2 Qb4+ 31. Kd1 Qb1+ 32. Kd2 Qb4+ 33. Kd1 Qb1+  ½ – ½ (view game)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
1. Aronian, Levon g ARM 2801 * ½ . . . ½ 1 1 . . 3 2948
2. Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar g AZE 2763 ½ * ½ ½ . . . . . 1 2854
3. Karjakin, Sergey g RUS 2760 . ½ * ½ . . . 1 . ½ 2840
4. Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 2741 . ½ ½ * . . ½ . 1 . 2859
5. Grischuk, Alexander g RUS 2771 . . . . * ½ ½ ½ 1 . 2845
6. Wang Hao g CHN 2727 ½ . . . ½ * . . ½ 1 2857
7. Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2791 0 . . ½ ½ . * . 1 . 2 2763
8. Gelfand, Boris g ISR 2741 0 . 0 . ½ . . * . 1 2679
9. Eljanov, Pavel g UKR 2742 . . . 0 0 ½ 0 . * . ½ 2435
10. Shirov, Alexei g ESP 2735 . 0 ½ . . 0 . 0 . * ½ 2425
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Bulgaria Possible Place of Origin of Chess according to Kirsan Ilyumzhinov

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 4, 2010 in Chess news

Kirsan IlyumzhinovThe Bulgarian city of Plovdiv is one of the plausibly suspected places of origin of chess, according to the President of the international chess federation FIDE Kirsan Ilyumzhinov.

In an interview for the Russian Kommersant daily, Ilyumzhinov explains that during his stay in Bulgaria in October he discussed with the heads of the Bulgarian Chess Federation the possibilities for staging the first international conference on history and origins of chess, to be hosted by the city of Sofia.

The FIDE states that India is only one possible places of origin of chess.

“This is one version. But do you know that ancient chess pieces have been found in Plovdiv? And this is one of the oldest cities in Europe. There are still theories about which country is the birthplace of chess. We first talked about India, then – about Persia. Last year I was in Mongolia, and its president showed me chess pieces found found in the tomb of Genghis Khan and the excavated burial mound. Check out their approximate age – they turned out to be 3 500 years old. The oldest chess pieces in India are maximum 2000 years old … Chess pieces have also been found in Latin America, in Peru. How did they end up there?” Ilyumzhinov asked.

He said the first ever scientific conference on the history of chess will take place in Sofia but did not specify when.

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John Nunn is the winner of the 34th World Chess Solving Championship

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 3, 2010 in Chess news

John NunnIn Crete, Greece, from October 19th to October 20th, took place the 34th World Chess Solving Championship.

The British GM John Nunn (aged 55) was the winner with 71 points, followed by Piotr Murdzia from Poland with 69.5 and Michael Pfannkuche from Germany with 64 pts.

In the team event, Poland (Piotr Gorski, Piotr Murdzia and Kacper Piorun) was the highest ranked followed by Russia and Germany.

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Ivanchuk won the 9th Cap d’Agde

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 2, 2010 in Chess news

Cup D AgdeIn France, from October 22nd to October 31st, took place the 9th Chess encounters Nationales and Internationales of Cap d’Agde.

The final match faced Vasily Ivanchuk (2754) from Ukraine and Hikaru Nakamura (2733) from USA. Ivanchuk beat Nakamura 1.5-0.5 in the final and obtained the title.

Group A

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1. Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 2733 * ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 3024
2. Bu Xiangzhi g CHN 2695 ½ * ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 2838
3. Nguyen Ngoc Truong Son g VIE 2633 0 ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 4 2666
4. Polgar, Judit g HUN 2682 0 0 ½ * 1 0 1 1 2609
5. Edouard, Romain g FRA 2636 0 ½ ½ 0 * 1 0 1 3 2566
6. Karpov, Anatoly g RUS 2619 0 0 0 1 0 * 1 ½ 2516
7. Kosintseva, Nadezhda m RUS 2565 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 * 1 2524
8. Milliet, Sophie m FRA 2388 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 * ½ 2229

Group B

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1. Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 2754 * ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 2825
2. Le Quang Liem g VIE 2694 ½ * ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 2834
3. Pelletier, Yannick g SUI 2592 0 ½ * 0 1 1 1 ½ 4 2668
4. Hammer, Jon Ludvig g NOR 2633 0 0 1 * ½ ½ 1 1 4 2662
5. Gharamian, Tigran g FRA 2658 ½ 0 0 ½ * ½ ½ 1 3 2559
6. Lahno, Kateryna g UKR 2539 0 0 0 ½ ½ * 1 1 3 2576
7. Zhu Chen g QAT 2480 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 0 * ½ 2 2476
8. Kosintseva, Tatiana g RUS 2573 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ * 1 2312

Nakamura,Hi (2733) – Ivanchuk,V (2754) [C38]
Trophee CCAS KO Cap d Agde FRA (3.2), 2010-10-31
1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 Bg7 5. h4 h6 6. d4 d6 7. c3 Nc6 8. O-O g4 9. Ne1 Qxh4 10. Bxf4 Nf6 11. e5 dxe5 12. dxe5 g3 13. Bxg3 Qxg3 14. exf6 Bf8 15. Nd3 Bd6 16. Qh5 Bg4 17. Bxf7+ Kf8 18. Qg6 Qh2+ 19. Kf2 Qg3+  ½ – ½ (view game)

Ivanchuk,V (2754) – Nakamura,Hi (2733) [C30]
Trophee CCAS KO Cap d Agde FRA (3.1), 2010-10-31
1. e4 e5 2. f4 Nc6 3. Nf3 f5 4. d3 d6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. g3 g6 7. Bg2 Bg7 8. fxe5 dxe5 9. Bg5 h6 10. Be3 O-O 11. O-O fxe4 12. dxe4 Be6 13. a3 Kh7 14. Kh1 a6 15. Bg1 Rf7 16. Qe2 Nd4 17. Qd3 Nxf3 18. Qxf3 Rd7 19. Rad1 Bg4 20. Rxd7 Bxf3 21. Rxd8 Bxg2+ 22. Kxg2 Rxd8 23. Be3 g5 24. h3 Kg6 25. g4 c6 26. Rf2 b5 27. Rd2 Rxd2+ 28. Bxd2 Bf8 29. Kf3 h5 30. Ne2 hxg4+ 31. hxg4 Nd7 32. Nc1 c5 33. Na2 Nb8 34. c4 bxc4 35. Nc3 Nc6 36. Nd5 Nd4+ 37. Ke3 Kf7 38. Nb6 Ke6 39. Nxc4 Be7 40. Ba5 Nb5 41. Kd3 Nd6 42. Nxd6  1 – 0 (view game)

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Database update

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 1, 2010 in Site news

The database was updated and 640 new games were added.

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Anand is the new #1 according to FIDE new rating

Posted by 365Chess.com on November 1, 2010 in Chess news

Viswanathan AnandThe FIDE published the last rating list. Viswanathan Anand is back to the first position relegating Magnus Carlsen to the second position. Due to the excellent performances of the past months, Levon Aronian is third.

The three top ranked players passed the 2800 ELO points barrier!

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